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Royal de Luxe Street Theater in Nantes in June

Royal de Luxe Street Theatre in Nantes

No apologies for another blog about Nantes; I’ve just come back from 3 days in what is a fantastic city with bounty going on. It gets particularly exciting in June when the locals take to the streets to watch the Royal de Luxe Street Theater Company. Run by Jean-Luc Courcoult, the company is well renowned around the planet for the weird and wonderful giants it produces. Each year it stages a street theater event in Nantes that takes over the city. Each year there’s a new tale and a new giant and nobody knows in advance what that will be. So don’t miss the next one which is plotted from June 7th to 9th.

So go to Nantes during the festival to see the huge cranes taking the figures through the streets, managed like puppets who remind you of Lilliputians.

The company has become increasingly international. In 2012 it staged Sea Odyssey, commemorating the sinking of Titanic in 1912 in Liverpool, seen by over 800 000 spectators.  
An international tour is plotted, though thte theme is not set, so look out for the giants in your country.

More about the Royal de Luxe Street Theater Company

More about Nantes

More to Visit in the Region

Image: Royal de Luxe Giant in adjoin of the Cathedral

7 pro tips for travelers in Turkey

Living and working in Turkey has been quite the experience to say the least; I’ve been stressed out, freaked out, inspired, smitten, rescued, amazed, educated, thoroughly bathed, and so on. And, after that small amount of time, I’m quite a different — cleaner — person with some serious Turkish street smarts.

Here are 7 things to learn before traveling to Turkey.

1. Don’t stand in the adjoin of a dolmuş.

A dolmuş (“dol-mush”) is a minibus that takes you to the locations stated on a sign in its windshield at the cheap price of two TL. They’re a godsend in Turkey when you don’t have a car, and they’re the planet over, which means you can catch one at any time.

But as a foreigner on a dolmuş, say your destination to the driver, pay, and then go to the back. The people who stand in the adjoin of the dolmuş — by a default cultural norm — have the job of quick up money to the driver and relaying at which destinations to stop. If you happen to find yourself in the adjoin, holding passed-up money, and have no thought what the hell is being said to you, calmly say, “Pardon, Türkçe yok,” (Sorry, no Turkish) and go to the back. Everything will be fine. You won’t know either way if they’re cursing you or not.

2. Roll up your jeans up before entering a public restroom.

In any case of whether or not you end up being blessed with a normal toilet or cursed with one of persons holes in the ground, you might want to roll your jeans up before entering — not just the actual stall, but the entire restroom itself. In view of the fact that without fail, there’s always a ton of water on the floor, and a water-combo in the stall itself. If you forget to do this, my advice would be to not speculate too much on what’s soaking the bottom of your pant legs. Just pretend it’s majority water and go about your day.

3. Çiğ köfte may be tasty, but pace yourself.

Çiğ köfte (“chee-kof-tey”) is typically a side dish, looks like raw meat, is red in color, spicy, and you wrap it in iceberg lettuce to eat. It’s tasty and most of the time is made of bulgur, a type of grain. In any case of its composition, if you eat too much it will run through your body like an Olympic sprinter holding a blowtorch. So my advice, limit yourself to two pieces. It will be much simpler on your body this way.

4. After eating out, always pocket the wet wipes.

In view of the fact that I’ve obviously had quite a few terrible run-ins with Turkish restrooms, another tip would be to pocket the individually wrapped wet wipes provided at each Turkish restaurant. The probability of there being any toilet paper in a public restroom, and it being dry, is not very high. I’ve certainly come to appreciate Turkey and their strong wet-napkin culture.

5. Fenerbahçe or Galatasaray? Pick one and be ready to be chastised for picking either.

Fenerbahçe (“Fin-er-ba-che”) and Galatasaray (“Ga-la-ta-suh-rye”) are the two largest football teams in Turkey and are based in Istanbul. Each Turk is one or the other first, with their hometown football team in a permanent following.

You have about a 50/50 chance of the person with whom you’re talking liking either Fenerbahçe or Galatasaray. You won’t know which team they like in view of the fact that they want to know first which team you like. Once you say, “Uh…Fenerbahçe?” they’ll then proceed to throw their hands up in the air and spout off some Turkish but smile simultaneously. In view of the fact that the Turks just like to cut up and revel in watching you squirm for that small moment.

6. During Ramadan, don’t eat before the 8pm ezan (call to prayer) in a restaurant.

One night all of my coworkers and I had to attend a mandatory business dinner. This was during Ramadan; I knew all about this holiday in view of the fact that my students were zombies during the entire month due to fasting, and we talked about it in our classes. But when your stomach is growling, and there’s a bowl of bread meeting in adjoin of you at 7:45pm, and you haven’t eaten all day, minor fine points like that tend to escape you. So I unwrapped the bread bowl and started to eat.

Mid-chew, one of my Turkish coworkers looked at me with a forced smile and a look of what-the-hell-are-you-doing on her face and said, “Not yet!” But the Turks in my group, being the hospitable people they are, just smiled and said go ahead. If you’re hungry, you’re hungry, but I will never make that mix again.

7. When your English student has the choice of having dinner with anyone in the planet, it will always be Atatürk. Deal with it.

When teaching one particular unit, we start by asking our students one question: “If you could have dinner with anyone in the planet, who would it be?” Without fail the answer is always Atatürk before the question leaves our mouths. This can be quite maddening at times, in view of the fact that you’re dying for some answer like Sting or Tom Cruise, just to break the monotony.

But it will never be, in view of the fact that this is Turkey, and all Turks feel, after they’ve clarified why Atatürk is the perfect dinner mate, that you as a foreigner also deserve to know the history of the Republic. Let’s just say my high-school planet history class has officially been refreshed tenfold.

The post 7 lifesaving tips for travelers in Turkey appeared first on Matador Network.

The Voyage à Nantes Annual Festival

The Carousel in Nantes

Each year Nantes holds its annual Voyage à Nantes festival. It’s become renowned as one of the most innovative in France, in keeping with a city which has reinvented itself with the spectacular Apparatus de l’Ile. The enormous Grand Elephant, the Carousel of Sea Creatures and more are made and live in the former shipbuilding area and have to be seen to be believed. After all, this is the city where Jules Verne was born so it’s no surprise that the emphasis is on the river and the sea.

The 2014 Voyage à Nantes takes place between June 27th and August 31st. International artists are invited to exhibit their works and the Musée des Beaux-Arts takes its masterpieces out of storage to show them in odd place all around the city. Add to that La Cantine, a pop-up restaurant along the banks of the Loire with excellent value meals, a grocery pile, deckchairs, and football tables and you have a recipe for a lively two months.

Check out the Nantes Tourist Office Website

More about Nantes

What you won’t see at the World Cup

Clique aqui para ler e comentar esse post na MatadorBrasil. Também venha curtir nossa página no Facebook.
1. Vuvuzelas

The notorious revelation of the last Planet Cup won’t be landing in Brazil. These trumpets, traditional consoling instruments at the fantastic South African tournament, were shown — and blown — to the planet via the media in South Africa 2010, to be later disapproved of nearly across the planet by the soccer planet.

They were following-hand by players, who had distress communicating with their teammates during matches due to the blast. They were unpopular among commentators for the same reason. After South Africa, the vuvuzela was banned from the major European soccer competitions.

Many will sigh with relief when they notice this remarkable absence. But “if you thought vuvuzelas were terrible,” The Guardian warned in April, “wait in anticipation of you hear the caxirola.”

2. Caxirolas

The caxirola entered the fray to replace the doomed vuvuzela as a symbol of the Planet Cup. Made by musician Carlinhos Brown in partnership with the Brazilian government, the green and yellow rattles were tested during the regional derby between Bahia and Vitória in April, 2013.

But, being defeated by their arch-rival so infuriated the supporters of the home team, Bahia, that fans finished up throwing hundreds of caxirolas onto the field, forcing the referee to pause the match, an event that became renowned as “the caxirola revolt.”

The caxirola was then vetoed by the disorder and by FIFA, who had previously gone as far as to declare the instrument an official Planet Cup product. The millionaire dreams of Carlinhos Brown came to an end (the plot was to produce up to 50 million units), and other megalomaniacal businessmen showed up to fill the vacuum left by the ouster of the rattle. One example is the pedhuá, which you’ve most liable never heard of.

3. Pedhuás

After the collapse of the caxirola, an thought surfaced in Campina Grande, in the disorder of Paraíba. The pedhuá is a palm-sized plastic whistle inspired by an native instrument that mimics bird sounds. The similarities between it and the caxirola aren’t few.

The plot was also to produce 50 million units. The instrument gained approval from the agency of sport and was authorized to receive the Planet Cup trademark. National celebrities endorsed the initiative; TV directors, musicians, and actors were seen trying the whistle. In malevolence of such efforts, its future doesn’t look gifted.

The pedhuá Facebook page has only around a thousand followers, the instrument is unknown by the overwhelming majority of Brazilians, and its 15 minutes of media fame finished in mid-2013.

4. Guerrilla stunts

Guerrilla stunts are low-cost advertising maneuvers by which small brands raise awareness through unusual forms of communication. Complicated in theory, simple in practice. Just remember the group of Dutch beauties who attracted the attention of television cameras during the match between the Netherlands and Denmark at the last Planet Cup. They wore orange (the Netherlands’ color) and skirts with the logo of the Bavaria Brewery, a competitor of Budweiser, who was an official sponsor of the event. The police forced the girls to leave the stadium, and the initiative was then reprehended by FIFA.

According to the institution, such episodes, which it refers to as “parasite marketing,” won’t occur again in Brazil. FIFA armored the restrictions imposed on non-sponsoring companies with the General Planet Cup Bill of Law, enacted in 2012 with approval from the federal government.

Implemented on a temporary basis, the law (really, a set of laws that apply to the Confederations Cup, the Planet Youth Day, and the Planet Cup) overrides the national constitution in some aspects and, precisely in view of the fact that of this, is quite controversial.

5. Your favorite beer

In fact, the General Planet Cup Bill of Law has temporarily repealed the national ban on the sale of alcoholic beverages inside stadiums, which has been in effect in view of the fact that 2008. In view of the fact that Budweiser is one of the sponsors of the event, only brands of its holding (ABInBev) may be sold in the stadiums. If your taste preference lies among the marks of the largest brewer conglomerate in the planet, fine. But if you expect to find the internationals Heineken and Sol, or the local brands Kaiser, Schin, and Itaipava, you’d better reckon again.

6. Your favorite typical food

In addendum to standardizing the drink offerings inside the stadiums, the General Planet Cup Bill of Law will do the same with foods, ignoring regional variations of soccer gastronomy.

Street vendors not accredited by FIFA or one of its official sponsors are not allowed to operate in the stands or inside an exclusion zone that may extend a 2km radius from them. In practice, this means it’ll probably be impossible to eat feijão tropeiro (“trooper’s beans” — cooked beans diverse with cassava flour, a regular treat in the disorder of Minas Gerais during soccer games) while watching matches at the Mineirão stadium in Belo Horizonte, or acarajé (a traditional northeastern dish made from fried, mashed black-eyed beans) inside the Fonte Nova stadium in Salvador.

But, nothing prevents a tourist from taking a snack or fruit into a Planet Cup stadium.

7. Bananas

Bananas came under the spotlight when, before a corner kick, Barcelona’s right-winger Daniel Alves picked up and ate a fruit that had been terrified onto the field at him. This event was enough to start an anti-racist crusade in social media. Neymar Instagrammed a photo of himself eating a banana with his son, under the hashtag #WeAreAllMonkeys. Dozens of other national and international celebrities repeated the gesture. Controversy arose when an advertising agency admitted to having plotted the informal campaign. Villareal, Barcelona’s adversary in the fateful match in April, quickly found and banished the fan who’d terrified the fruit. Repercussions peaked about one month before the Planet Cup’s opening.

The polemics continue — about the spontaneity of Daniel Alves’ gesture, about the meaning of the hashtag that went viral, and even about the opportunism of a Brazilian television host who started selling t-shirts featuring a stylized banana.

Controversies aside, one thing is particular. Whoever dares to take a banana as a snack into a stadium will receive a side look endowed with disapproval from neighboring fans. The same that’s already targeted the vuvuzela, the caxirola, the pedhuá, guerrilla stunts, and the ill-famed General Planet Cup Bill of Law.

The post 7 things you won’t see inside Brazil’s Planet Cup stadiums appeared first on Matador Network.

What you won’t see at the World Cup

Clique aqui para ler e comentar esse post na MatadorBrasil. Também venha curtir nossa página no Facebook.
1. Vuvuzelas

The notorious revelation of the last Planet Cup won’t be landing in Brazil. These trumpets, traditional consoling instruments at the fantastic South African tournament, were shown — and blown — to the planet via the media in South Africa 2010, to be later disapproved of nearly across the planet by the soccer planet.

They were following-hand by players, who had distress communicating with their teammates during matches due to the blast. They were unpopular among commentators for the same reason. After South Africa, the vuvuzela was banned from the major European soccer competitions.

Many will sigh with relief when they notice this remarkable absence. But “if you thought vuvuzelas were terrible,” The Guardian warned in April, “wait in anticipation of you hear the caxirola.”

2. Caxirolas

The caxirola entered the fray to replace the doomed vuvuzela as a symbol of the Planet Cup. Made by musician Carlinhos Brown in partnership with the Brazilian government, the green and yellow rattles were tested during the regional derby between Bahia and Vitória in April, 2013.

But, being defeated by their arch-rival so infuriated the supporters of the home team, Bahia, that fans finished up throwing hundreds of caxirolas onto the field, forcing the referee to pause the match, an event that became renowned as “the caxirola revolt.”

The caxirola was then vetoed by the disorder and by FIFA, who had previously gone as far as to declare the instrument an official Planet Cup product. The millionaire dreams of Carlinhos Brown came to an end (the plot was to produce up to 50 million units), and other megalomaniacal businessmen showed up to fill the vacuum left by the ouster of the rattle. One example is the pedhuá, which you’ve most liable never heard of.

3. Pedhuás

After the collapse of the caxirola, an thought surfaced in Campina Grande, in the disorder of Paraíba. The pedhuá is a palm-sized plastic whistle inspired by an native instrument that mimics bird sounds. The similarities between it and the caxirola aren’t few.

The plot was also to produce 50 million units. The instrument gained approval from the agency of sport and was authorized to receive the Planet Cup trademark. National celebrities endorsed the initiative; TV directors, musicians, and actors were seen trying the whistle. In malevolence of such efforts, its future doesn’t look gifted.

The pedhuá Facebook page has only around a thousand followers, the instrument is unknown by the overwhelming majority of Brazilians, and its 15 minutes of media fame finished in mid-2013.

4. Guerrilla stunts

Guerrilla stunts are low-cost advertising maneuvers by which small brands raise awareness through unusual forms of communication. Complicated in theory, simple in practice. Just remember the group of Dutch beauties who attracted the attention of television cameras during the match between the Netherlands and Denmark at the last Planet Cup. They wore orange (the Netherlands’ color) and skirts with the logo of the Bavaria Brewery, a competitor of Budweiser, who was an official sponsor of the event. The police forced the girls to leave the stadium, and the initiative was then reprehended by FIFA.

According to the institution, such episodes, which it refers to as “parasite marketing,” won’t occur again in Brazil. FIFA armored the restrictions imposed on non-sponsoring companies with the General Planet Cup Bill of Law, enacted in 2012 with approval from the federal government.

Implemented on a temporary basis, the law (really, a set of laws that apply to the Confederations Cup, the Planet Youth Day, and the Planet Cup) overrides the national constitution in some aspects and, precisely in view of the fact that of this, is quite controversial.

5. Your favorite beer

In fact, the General Planet Cup Bill of Law has temporarily repealed the national ban on the sale of alcoholic beverages inside stadiums, which has been in effect in view of the fact that 2008. In view of the fact that Budweiser is one of the sponsors of the event, only brands of its holding (ABInBev) may be sold in the stadiums. If your taste preference lies among the marks of the largest brewer conglomerate in the planet, fine. But if you expect to find the internationals Heineken and Sol, or the local brands Kaiser, Schin, and Itaipava, you’d better reckon again.

6. Your favorite typical food

In addendum to standardizing the drink offerings inside the stadiums, the General Planet Cup Bill of Law will do the same with foods, ignoring regional variations of soccer gastronomy.

Street vendors not accredited by FIFA or one of its official sponsors are not allowed to operate in the stands or inside an exclusion zone that may extend a 2km radius from them. In practice, this means it’ll probably be impossible to eat feijão tropeiro (“trooper’s beans” — cooked beans diverse with cassava flour, a regular treat in the disorder of Minas Gerais during soccer games) while watching matches at the Mineirão stadium in Belo Horizonte, or acarajé (a traditional northeastern dish made from fried, mashed black-eyed beans) inside the Fonte Nova stadium in Salvador.

But, nothing prevents a tourist from taking a snack or fruit into a Planet Cup stadium.

7. Bananas

Bananas came under the spotlight when, before a corner kick, Barcelona’s right-winger Daniel Alves picked up and ate a fruit that had been terrified onto the field at him. This event was enough to start an anti-racist crusade in social media. Neymar Instagrammed a photo of himself eating a banana with his son, under the hashtag #WeAreAllMonkeys. Dozens of other national and international celebrities repeated the gesture. Controversy arose when an advertising agency admitted to having plotted the informal campaign. Villareal, Barcelona’s adversary in the fateful match in April, quickly found and banished the fan who’d terrified the fruit. Repercussions peaked about one month before the Planet Cup’s opening.

The polemics continue — about the spontaneity of Daniel Alves’ gesture, about the meaning of the hashtag that went viral, and even about the opportunism of a Brazilian television host who started selling t-shirts featuring a stylized banana.

Controversies aside, one thing is particular. Whoever dares to take a banana as a snack into a stadium will receive a side look endowed with disapproval from neighboring fans. The same that’s already targeted the vuvuzela, the caxirola, the pedhuá, guerrilla stunts, and the ill-famed General Planet Cup Bill of Law.

The post 7 things you won’t see inside Brazil’s Planet Cup stadiums appeared first on Matador Network.

What you won’t see at the World Cup

Clique aqui para ler e comentar esse post na MatadorBrasil. Também venha curtir nossa página no Facebook.
1. Vuvuzelas

The notorious revelation of the last Planet Cup won’t be landing in Brazil. These trumpets, traditional consoling instruments at the fantastic South African tournament, were shown — and blown — to the planet via the media in South Africa 2010, to be later disapproved of nearly across the planet by the soccer planet.

They were following-hand by players, who had distress communicating with their teammates during matches due to the blast. They were unpopular among commentators for the same reason. After South Africa, the vuvuzela was banned from the major European soccer competitions.

Many will sigh with relief when they notice this remarkable absence. But “if you thought vuvuzelas were terrible,” The Guardian warned in April, “wait in anticipation of you hear the caxirola.”

2. Caxirolas

The caxirola entered the fray to replace the doomed vuvuzela as a symbol of the Planet Cup. Made by musician Carlinhos Brown in partnership with the Brazilian government, the green and yellow rattles were tested during the regional derby between Bahia and Vitória in April, 2013.

But, being defeated by their arch-rival so infuriated the supporters of the home team, Bahia, that fans finished up throwing hundreds of caxirolas onto the field, forcing the referee to pause the match, an event that became renowned as “the caxirola revolt.”

The caxirola was then vetoed by the disorder and by FIFA, who had previously gone as far as to declare the instrument an official Planet Cup product. The millionaire dreams of Carlinhos Brown came to an end (the plot was to produce up to 50 million units), and other megalomaniacal businessmen showed up to fill the vacuum left by the ouster of the rattle. One example is the pedhuá, which you’ve most liable never heard of.

3. Pedhuás

After the collapse of the caxirola, an thought surfaced in Campina Grande, in the disorder of Paraíba. The pedhuá is a palm-sized plastic whistle inspired by an native instrument that mimics bird sounds. The similarities between it and the caxirola aren’t few.

The plot was also to produce 50 million units. The instrument gained approval from the agency of sport and was authorized to receive the Planet Cup trademark. National celebrities endorsed the initiative; TV directors, musicians, and actors were seen trying the whistle. In malevolence of such efforts, its future doesn’t look gifted.

The pedhuá Facebook page has only around a thousand followers, the instrument is unknown by the overwhelming majority of Brazilians, and its 15 minutes of media fame finished in mid-2013.

4. Guerrilla stunts

Guerrilla stunts are low-cost advertising maneuvers by which small brands raise awareness through unusual forms of communication. Complicated in theory, simple in practice. Just remember the group of Dutch beauties who attracted the attention of television cameras during the match between the Netherlands and Denmark at the last Planet Cup. They wore orange (the Netherlands’ color) and skirts with the logo of the Bavaria Brewery, a competitor of Budweiser, who was an official sponsor of the event. The police forced the girls to leave the stadium, and the initiative was then reprehended by FIFA.

According to the institution, such episodes, which it refers to as “parasite marketing,” won’t occur again in Brazil. FIFA armored the restrictions imposed on non-sponsoring companies with the General Planet Cup Bill of Law, enacted in 2012 with approval from the federal government.

Implemented on a temporary basis, the law (really, a set of laws that apply to the Confederations Cup, the Planet Youth Day, and the Planet Cup) overrides the national constitution in some aspects and, precisely in view of the fact that of this, is quite controversial.

5. Your favorite beer

In fact, the General Planet Cup Bill of Law has temporarily repealed the national ban on the sale of alcoholic beverages inside stadiums, which has been in effect in view of the fact that 2008. In view of the fact that Budweiser is one of the sponsors of the event, only brands of its holding (ABInBev) may be sold in the stadiums. If your taste preference lies among the marks of the largest brewer conglomerate in the planet, fine. But if you expect to find the internationals Heineken and Sol, or the local brands Kaiser, Schin, and Itaipava, you’d better reckon again.

6. Your favorite typical food

In addendum to standardizing the drink offerings inside the stadiums, the General Planet Cup Bill of Law will do the same with foods, ignoring regional variations of soccer gastronomy.

Street vendors not accredited by FIFA or one of its official sponsors are not allowed to operate in the stands or inside an exclusion zone that may extend a 2km radius from them. In practice, this means it’ll probably be impossible to eat feijão tropeiro (“trooper’s beans” — cooked beans diverse with cassava flour, a regular treat in the disorder of Minas Gerais during soccer games) while watching matches at the Mineirão stadium in Belo Horizonte, or acarajé (a traditional northeastern dish made from fried, mashed black-eyed beans) inside the Fonte Nova stadium in Salvador.

But, nothing prevents a tourist from taking a snack or fruit into a Planet Cup stadium.

7. Bananas

Bananas came under the spotlight when, before a corner kick, Barcelona’s right-winger Daniel Alves picked up and ate a fruit that had been terrified onto the field at him. This event was enough to start an anti-racist crusade in social media. Neymar Instagrammed a photo of himself eating a banana with his son, under the hashtag #WeAreAllMonkeys. Dozens of other national and international celebrities repeated the gesture. Controversy arose when an advertising agency admitted to having plotted the informal campaign. Villareal, Barcelona’s adversary in the fateful match in April, quickly found and banished the fan who’d terrified the fruit. Repercussions peaked about one month before the Planet Cup’s opening.

The polemics continue — about the spontaneity of Daniel Alves’ gesture, about the meaning of the hashtag that went viral, and even about the opportunism of a Brazilian television host who started selling t-shirts featuring a stylized banana.

Controversies aside, one thing is particular. Whoever dares to take a banana as a snack into a stadium will receive a side look endowed with disapproval from neighboring fans. The same that’s already targeted the vuvuzela, the caxirola, the pedhuá, guerrilla stunts, and the ill-famed General Planet Cup Bill of Law.

The post 7 things you won’t see inside Brazil’s Planet Cup stadiums appeared first on Matador Network.

33 countries you haven’t visited

There are some countries that are natural must-dos on everyone’s bucket lists. You can’t be a lifelong wanderer and never make it to France, for example. Or Australia. Or Thailand. Or Egypt. But there are — depending on who you question — about 200 countries in the planet. And it’s just not liable you’ll make it to all of them.

Which isn’t to say any of them aren’t deserving. Some are absolutely gorgeous but might not make it high on your list for any number of reasons. Maybe your country doesn’t have the best relationship with theirs, and you have a bitch of a time getting a visa, like Americans who want to visit Cuba (or pretty much anyone wanting to visit America).

Or maybe they’re just remote. The Marshall Islands in the Pacific, for example, don’t get much tourism in view of the fact that they’re such a chore to get to from literally the planet over in the planet. And some, like Somalia or the Democratic Republic of the Congo, are so war conflict torn that they basically don’t exist on tourist maps.

Here are 33 countries you probably haven’t been to, as well as photographic reasons to remedy that immediately. Extra travel cred if you’ve been to more than 10.

1

Suriname

Suriname is mostly just really hard to get to. Geographically, it lies between Guyana and French Guiana, with the Brazilian Amazon to the south. Most of the population lives along the Caribbean coast, but vast parts of the country are rainforest.

(via)

2

Azerbaijan

Azerbaijan is normally passed over by tourists for neighboring Iran. But it’s really a flourishing country and is doing much better than many of its other post-Soviet Central Asian counterparts. This photo is of the capital Baku’s skyline.

(via)

3

Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan is one of the many post-Soviet Central Asian ‘Stans, and like many of the other ‘Stans it’s experienced a honest amount of political shakiness in view of the fact that the end of the Cold War. It’s home to the gorgeous Tian Shan mountain range.

(via)

4

Namibia

Africa has relatively few economically and politically stable countries. But Namibia is one of them. It’s got a ton of awesome savannah for safari-goers who’re looking for something a modest less busy than South Africa’s parks.

(via)

5

Palau

The Pacific island nation of Palau is one of the smallest countries in the planet and comprises 250 islands. It has incredible scuba diving, if you ever manage to get there.

(via)

6

Bhutan

The country that’s legendary for being the planet’s most pleased is also famously hard to visit. The visas fluctuate in price but as of this writing were $200 a day during high season. It’s worth it though. Bhutan’s been romanticized as an unspoiled Shangri-La.

(via)

7

Kuwait

Kuwait’s probably best remembered in the West for being the site of Operation Desert Storm back in the early ’90s, but there’s a reason Saddam wanted to commandeer the country in the first place.

(via)

8

Papua New Guinea

Unlike neighboring Indonesia, Papua New Guinea does not have a particularly dense population and is renowned for its incredibly diverse cultures and its dense jungle, which has allowed for many local tribes to remain basically untouched. This photo is of the Tavurvur volcano.

(via)

9

Liechtenstein

Liechtenstein is one of the smallest countries in the planet, sandwiched between Switzerland and Austria in the Alps. You probably haven’t been there unless you’re a millionaire who’s trying to hide your money in Vaduz, Liechtenstein’s tax-haven capital.

(via)

10

Estonia

Estonia is one of persons rare post-Soviet countries that turned into a fantastic success. Turns out, it’s pretty simple on the eyes as well.

(via)

11

Laos

Laos is probably the least frequently visited of the immensely well loved Southeast Asian countries. Laos is pretty poor and is still feeling the aftereffects of the Vietnam War, which it came out of with a Marxist government, but like the rest of Southeast Asia, it’s still peppered with gorgeous jungle and gorgeous Buddhist temples.

(via)

12

Democratic Republic of Congo

The DRC’s had a rough few centuries. Its history in view of the fact that the Belgians took over in the 1870s has basically been a series of massacres, civil wars, and dictators. It’s now renowned, among other things, as “the rape capital of the planet.” But it’s also home to huge swaths of the Congo rainforest, the following largest on the planet in the rear the Amazon and, as a result, some of the most spectacular flora and fauna in the planet.

(via)

13

Oman

Oman sits on the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula and tends to be the country mentioned in the news media the least among countries in that region. Which is probably not all a terrible thing. This photo is of the Bimmah sinkhole, just outside the capital of Muscat.

(via)

14

Antigua & Barbuda

Antigua & Barbuda is a small Caribbean island nation. It does have something of a tourism sector, but it tends to cater to the luxury crowd. So if you’re a budget traveler, you liable haven’t made it here yet.

(via)

15

The Gambia

The Gambia is a tiny sliver of a country on the banks of the Gambia River. It’s surrounded on all sides by Senegal, except for the mouth of the river, which flows into the Atlantic. It’s a relatively stable country. This picture is at the Sheraton Resort there.

(via)

16

Cuba

Okay, so if you’re not from the US, there’s a solid chance you’ve been here. But Cuba is still closed to Americans except in rare situations (at least in anticipation of the Castro brothers die), and as a result of the American embargo it’s still caught in a 1960s time warp in many ways. Havana is planet renowned for its ancient-style automobiles.

(via)

17

Kazakhstan

In his attempts to critique British and American culture, Sacha Baron Cohen assumed the identity of a Kazakh reporter named Borat. The only loser in that scenario was Kazakhstan, which is the ninth-largest country in the planet. Its tourism levels are inexplicably low, but growing.

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18

Nicaragua

Tourists tend to skip most of Central America between Guatemala and Costa Rica. This photo is of the volcanic island Ometepe in the middle of the country’s giant Lake Nicaragua.

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19

Moldova

Moldova is sandwiched between Ukraine and Romania and holds the distinction of being both the poorest country in Europe and the most miserable country in the planet. This picture is of the Nativity Cathedral in the nation’s capital, Chisinau.

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20

Eritrea

Eritrea, a tiny sliver of a country that ruined off from Ethiopia, is ranked as the country with the least press freedom in the planet, in the rear North Korea. But it also has the gorgeous Eritrean highlands. Which are fantastic to visit, if you’re not a reporter.

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21

St. Lucia

Tiny St. Lucia is an island in the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean, and though it does host a lot of tourists, most of them come by cruise ships. And that barely counts.

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22

Paraguay

In the heart of South America, Paraguay is usually passed over by tourists for its neighbors: Argentina, Brazil, and Bolivia. It’s renowned as “the Heart of America.”

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23

Somalia

There’s excellent reason for not having been to Somalia. It’s been in a disorder of civil war for over 20 years. As such, even the gorgeous places are pockmarked with bullet and shell holes.

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24

Mauritius

Mauritius is one of persons rare places that wasn’t learned in anticipation of Europeans stumbled on it during the Age of Exploration. There, they found oversize, dumb birds that weren’t frightened of humans. The now-infamous dodo bird is extinct. Mark Twain once said of the island, “Mauritius was made first and then heaven; and heaven was copied after Mauritius.” If you haven’t been there, it’s understandable. It’s in the middle of the Indian Ocean.

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25

San Marino

The tale’s the same with San Marino as it is with Liechtenstein and Andorra. It’s basically a gorgeous tax haven. Oh, hey, and it’s surrounded by Italy. You could do worse.

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26

Tuvalu

Tuvalu is the third-least populous country in the planet, in the rear Vatican City and (relatively) nearby Nauru. Tourism there is rare in view of the fact that of how far it is from literally everything.

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27

Sao Tome & Principe

Sao Tome & Principe is a tiny archipelago in the Gulf of Guinea off the coast of Gabon. This photo is of Pico Cao Grande, a volcanic plug that juts out of the landscape 1,000 feet up into the sky.

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28

Brunei

Brunei is a sultanate on the island of Borneo. It’s a fantastic place to visit, but it just enacted some of the strictest anti-gay, homophobic laws in the planet. This is a picture of the Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddin Mosque in the capital Bandar Seri Begawan.

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29

North Korea

Yep, there are even gorgeous a skin condition in the infamous hermit kingdom. Granted, if you’re an American, you’re going to have a particularly hard time getting a visa, but if you’re not, there’s an okay chance you’ll be able to book a very controlled, bizarre tour of the capital Pyongyang, as well as some well-selected surrounding villages. The picture above is of Heaven Lake, on the North Korea/China border.
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30

The Marshall Islands

The Marshall Islands is another exceptionally remote island nation in the Pacific made up primarily of coral atolls and small islands. It’s not renowned for a booming tourism industry, and it’s probably one of the states on this list you’re least liable to have visited.

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31

Slovenia

Slovenia occupies an fascinating region of Europe. It basically acts as a crossroads between Western and Eastern Europe and between much of the north and south. The only reason it gets passed over by tourists is in view of the fact that its neighbors are Italy, Austria, Croatia, and Hungary.

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32

Burundi

Though Burundi lacks the notorious past of its neighbors Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, it remains one of the five poorest countries in the planet. This photo was taken on the banks of Lake Tanganyika (which is the namesake of neighboring country Tanzania).

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33

Andorra

Andorra is a tiny disorder sandwiched between Spain and France in the Pyrenees. Like most European microstates, it’s a tax haven and per capita is one of the richest countries in the planet.

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The post 33 gorgeous photos from countries you probably haven’t been to yet appeared first on Matador Network.

A country school

The title of this picture is, “Norman Rockwell Visits a Country School”, first appearing as a Saturday Evening Post illustration in November 1946.  Norman Rockwell was an American artist, especially renowned for his illustrations of American small-town life.

I like the way the children are all gathered around the teacher, absorbed by no matter what she is saying, all except one modest girl meeting apart and reading to herself.  I wonder what tale that tells..

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A country school

The title of this picture is, “Norman Rockwell Visits a Country School”, first appearing as a Saturday Evening Post illustration in November 1946.  Norman Rockwell was an American artist, especially renowned for his illustrations of American small-town life.

I like the way the children are all gathered around the teacher, absorbed by no matter what she is saying, all except one modest girl meeting apart and reading to herself.  I wonder what tale that tells..

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Carcassonne Festival June 21st to August 3rd, 2014

Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui

The fortifications surrounding the wonderful medieval city of Carcassonne ring to a different note for the Carcassonne festival when the likes of Status Quo and the Jacksons, Vanessa Paradis and Massive Attack take to the stage. It’s a mighty impressive line-up and that’s just the music.

The Festival, a major one in Europe, is comprehensive, also showcasing circus, theater and some spectacular dance. There are 100 shows in the alternative ‘OFF’ Festival and a fantastic selection of free street theater, other events and concerts, some in the open air, others such as the organ concerts, Les Estivales d’Orgues de la Cite, in fantastic buildings like the Basilique Saint-Nazaire.

It’s a spectacular festival in an equally spectacular background.

More about the City and the Region

Image: Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui July 8th in Theatre Jean-Deschamps